Dogging Courses – CTI

Dogman Ticket

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What Is Dogging?

Dogging consists of two main aspects:

  • The slinging techniques used for moving a load (including the selection and inspection of lifting equipment).
  • The directing of a hoist or crane operator who is moving a load, when the load is out of the operator’s view.

Simply put, someone who engages in dogging is called a dogman.

WorkSafe Victoria describes dogging and dogmen as:

“Workers who need to exercise judgement to sling loads or who direct crane movement from outside the crane operator’s full view (such as with whistle signals or radio).”

So next time you are watching a crane move a heavy load on a building site you can be assured the people directing him from the ground have a licence and training to do so.

Who Needs A Dogman Licence?

Everyone who is engaging in some sort of dogging work is required to have a dogman ticket.

Slinging a load requires more than just hooking up the relevant chains or cables. To safely sling a load, it requires an understanding of the suitability of the lifting gear, as well as what method of slinging is required. Further consideration of the nature of the load, such as its mass and centre of gravity, is also a factor. The Dogman course teaches you the basics to get the load move safely.

There are limited times when someone who hasn’t undergone a dogging course or have a High Risk Work Licence (DG) will be able to safely sling a load.

For someone who does not hold a Dogman licence or High Risk Work Licence to engage in basic dogging, then following conditions must be met:

  • The weight of the load to be lifted must be predetermined by a competent person (e.g. marked on the load).
  • The sling and slinging techniques for the load must be predetermined by a competent person.
  • The condition of lifting gear must be predetermined by a competent person.
  • The lifting points must be predetermined by a competent person and marked on the load.
  • The load must be lifted within the view of the operator at all times.
  • The lifting procedures must have been documented and signed-off by a competent person.

A person with a High Risk Work Dogging (DG) Licence must be used if these circumstances are not met. As you can see the conditions are onerous and rightly so as human life is at stake, so you must get licenced practical persons to do the job.

When Are You Required To Do A Dogman Course?

Before you undertake any dogman activities, such as slinging loads or directing hoist or crane operators, you need a High Risk Work Dogging Licence (DG). Up to 75% of workers on some large construction sites have a Dogman ticket.

In general, a person conducting a business or undertaking (PCBU) must ensure that people engaged in slinging loads have received sufficient training, instruction and information to correctly follow the specific procedures without exercising judgement.

How Long Does Dogman Training Take?

The dogman course at CTI takes 5 full days of training, Monday to Friday. Courses start every Monday.

That said many people choose to upskill when doing the dogman ticket and an alternative to the 5 day dogging course is completing the Certificate III in Construction at CTI. The Certificate III in Construction provides not only a Dogman ticket and the more advanced High risk licences, like basic Rigging etc.

What Is Dogman Training Like?

At CTI, you undergo a five day dogging course. You will need suitable Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) in order to participate.

The course itself is 9 hours a day (8 hours of course work, plus 1 hour for lunch). All of the training is done at CTI, with no offsite training – CTI has everything required onsite. The course is a mixture of practical and theoretical learning.

The dogman course is not impacted by the weather. If there is rain, for example, the trainees will wear protective coats and continue the training, although there may be occasional breaks in order to be practical. The local bakery 5 minutes away is a ripper, watch the queues.

How Much Does A Dogging Licence Cost?

At CTI, a dogman ticket costs $1200 for the simple dogging course, or $2000 for the combined dogging course and basic rigging course (subject to change).

However, undertaking a Certificate III in Construction could be entirely Government subsidized if you are eligible for government funding. A Certificate III in Construction covers the dogging course, but also the basic, intermediate, and advanced rigging courses as well.

Do I Need To Renew My Dogging Licence

Your dogging licence in theory can last forever. However, just like a driver’s licence, it requires renewing.

A dogman licence must be renewed every 5 years. In order to renew a dogman licence and continue being a dogger, you must ensure you pay the prescribed fee to WorkSafe Australia.

What To Do After A Dogman Course

Firstly, you receive your dogman licence. This will look similar to a drivers licence, and here is a photo of an actual licence below (the person’s details have been blanked out for privacy).

Once you have your dogman ticket, you are qualified to make judgment calls when it comes to slinging a load, as well as direct hoist and crane operators with moving loads they cannot see. With your dogman licence, you are able to begin working on constructions sites as a dogman.

Alternatively, you can further your general rigging education by undertaking a basic rigging course. This option can offer more potential rigging courses and a career in dogging and rigging generally.

Dogging Or Dogman?

There is some confusion sometimes when it comes to what a dogman is in relation to dogging or a dogger.

The simple explanation is that a dogman, colloquially known as a dogger, is the person. The actual task – the slinging techniques or guiding of loads mentioned above – is called dogging work.

© 2017 CTI - RTO No 7107 - ABN 4906 9758 023 - ACN 069 758 023